Evaluation

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) mandates that school districts identify, locate and evaluate children with disabilities. Evaluation can take place as early as age 3 and must be conducted at least every three years.

Special Education Evaluations

Evaluation is a critical moment in your child's education. Depending on the evaluation, districts either will or will not provide programs and services to address your child's needs. The evaluation drives the development of your child's educational plan. Frequently, parents strongly disagree with the results of the evaluation. That's when it's time to work with a respected special education attorney like Sharon Ramage.

Which Conditions Qualify As Disabilities?

To be eligible for special education and related services, a student must have a qualifying disability. These disabilities include:

  • Autism
  • Blindness or other visual impairment
  • Deafness or other hearing impairment
  • Emotional disturbance
  • Intellectual disability
  • Multiple disabilities
  • Orthopedic impairment
  • Other health impairment
  • Specific learning disability
  • Speech or language impairment
  • Traumatic brain injury

Having a diagnosis for any of these conditions does not guarantee eligibility for special ed services. Parents must demonstrate that the disability hurts their child's educational performance. The special education evaluation will address your child's disability as well as the impact that disability has on his or her education.

If you disagree with your child's evaluation, you have the right to request an independent educational evaluation (IEE) at the school's expense.

Let special education lawyer Sharon Ramage advocate for the independent educational evaluation that is right for your child. Her home office is in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, but she serves the entire state. Call her at 877-308-7129.